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VOL. Lj With 75 Engravings. J NO. 5, 




THE AMERICAN 

COMIC ALMANAC. 




^With Whims, Scraps and Oddities 




BOSTOK— SOIiP BY ALL^N Sc CO., 72 STATS ST. 



PUBLISH IvD BY CHARLES LLLMS, Agknj, BUSToA. 



The Comic Token, for 1835. 
A companion to the Comic Almanac; containing a variety 
of Fun and Humor- illustrated with numerous plates and di- 
verting devices. It will be well for each of the readers of this 
Almanac to have a copy, as they are partially connected. — 
Price 12J cents. 



Chronological Cycles. 



Dominical Letter,- DlEpact, - - - 1 
Lunar Cycle, - - 12jSolar Cycle, - - 24 



Roman Indiction, - 
Julian Period, - 6548 



SPRING SIGNS. 

°f Aries, 
y Taurus, 
n Gemini. 



Signs of the Zodiac, 

SUMMER SIGNS. 

o[5 Cancer. 

SI Le0 - 
n^ Virgo. 



AUTUMN SIGNS. 

£1 Libra. 
tt^ Scorpio. 
f Sagittarius. 



WINTER SIGNS. 

VJ Capricorn us, 
ZZ Aquarius. 
X Pisces. 



Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1834, 

By Charles Ellm-s, Agent, 

in the Clerk's Office of the District of Massachusetts. 



A Few Words to our Patrons. 

. The approach of a good bone is not likely to alarm a hungry dog ; 
neither will our jolly readers be so by our timely appearance. If 
"Laugh and grow Fat" be a questionable maxim, "Laugh and grow 
Old" is an indisputable one : for so long as we can laugh at all, we 
shall never die unless it be of laughing. As to performing this 
operation in one's sleeve, it is a base compromise ; no more compara- 
ble to the original, than a teeth-dis- 
playing simper to that hilarious roar 
which shakes the wrinkles out of the 
heart, and frightens Old Time from ad- 
vancing towards us. There is no wis- 
dom more profound than that which 
developes itself by our risible faculties. 
I feel an antipathy towards a whale, 
because it has a tendency to blubber. 
I abominate the common Crier, simply 
on account of his name ; and a lost 
child can always be its own crier. I 
would rather get wet through than 
seek shelter under a weeping willow, 
and I instinctively avoid birch on ac- 
count of certain juvenile recollections. 
We this year anticipate several Rich- 
__„ __ monds in the field— but, as usual, we 

Cock of the Walk. * ha!1 b * th * " Cock of * e Walk '" 




HUMOUR. 

A large party of soldiers surprising some resurrection men in a' 
-=- — - churchyard, the 

officer seizing 
one of them, ask- 
ed him what he 
hadtosayforhim 
self: " Say, sir,' 
replied the sur 
j geon's provider, 
why that wecame 
here to raise a 
corpse and not a 
regiment" 

Can the Leopard change his spots? Yes; if he don't like 
one spot he can go to another. 

If you wish to have a shoe of durable materials, you should 
make the upper leather of the mouth of a hard drinker; for 

that never lets in water. 

Plain Enough. An impertinent fellow asked who that 
plain lady was before him. "That lady," said he, "is my 
wife. It is true she is a plain woman —I am a plain man — 
you are a plain dealer ; and that is the plain truth." 





b 



Old Bet, crying " Mac-ca-rel," happened to meet 
A workman who carried a beam in the street ; 
Her basket unluckily fell from its place, 
As he awkwardly gave her " a beam in the face ! " 

11 Hoy ! have a care, missus ! " he leisurely cried ; 
When aiming a blow at his face, she replied, 
"Why should I take care, now the mischief is done, 
D'ye intend, fool, to hit me again, for your fun ? " 




ECLIPSES IN 1835. 

There will this yearbeeclip 
pes of the sun on the 27th of 
May and November 20th, ar.r 
a very small eclipse of the mooi 
on the 10th of June ; all of 
which will be invisible through 
out the United States. The 
first eclipse of the sun will be 
visible in South America and 
Africa, and a very small part of 
the south of Europe. The sec- 
. ond eclipse of the sun will 

LUJNAK GAL STIC. be visible throughout Africa 

Snain, the south of Ireland, and nearly the whole of the Indian Ocean. 

Tl»e eclipse of the moon will be visible through all Europe south of the 
trot ic circle,, all Africa, and a large part of western Asia, 

There will also happen this year a transit of Mercury,, whieh will be 

»artly visible throughout the United States. At Boston it wilLtake place 

is foHf»ws, viz. f 

Transit begins ........ 46J a. 

Mercury wholly entered on the Sun . . . 48 " j , T 
Nearest approach of Mercury to the Sun's centre, 3* 20J »< S Me * n * 1m f 

Sun's lower limb sets 4 44, ^ , at Boston. 

Transit ends 5 55£ " ) 

At New Orleans the whole transit will be visible, which will not be the 
case in any_ other Ikrjnfe town in the United States. 



.',:] 



TIDE TABLE. 

The time «f high water in the calendar pages is computed for Boston ; but the time, at 
either of the fallowing places, may he readily found, hy adding or subtracting, as the 
;use may he, the difference te» or. from the time, at that city 
H. m-. ? \r.. ~n. 



\ibany - - • add 4 
Charleston, S.C. miI>. 4 
Nantucket - - add 
sew- 1 ted ford - sub. 3 
Vow-London - sub. 2 



m-. f 

i-3 Xew-Yoi 
00 | Nowbnrv 



rk - - sub. 2 
0') t Nowburyport - sub. 
30 I Philadelphia - add 2 
53 Portland - - - sub. 
36 | Portsmouth, N.H. sub 



h. m 

Providence - - sub. 3 0b 
Savannah - - - sub. 3 
Ft- Johns, N. B. add 
Vineyard Sound sub. 




FERMENTATION OF BEER. 




A Good Household Beer. 

Take a heaped half peck of wheat bran, and three or four ounces 
'of hops : Boil them a quarter of an hour in fifteen gallons of clear wa- 
ter : Strain it through a close sieve and sweeten it with two quarts of 
molasses : Cool it quick till it is no warmer than new milk, and fill 
your half barrel. Warm water may be used to fill up the cask if 
needful. Leave the bung out for twenty-four hours, that the drink 
may work and throw off the yeast, and it will then be fit for use. 
About the fourth or fifth day, bottle off what remains in the vessel 
especially if the weather be hot, that it may not turn sour or stale, 
[f the cask be new or not before Hsed for beer, apply yeast or beer 
grounds to ferment it : otherwise it wilt not be necessary. 





Portrait of a remarkable Little Dog, 
whose Tail curled so tight, that it lifted 
him off his hind legs ! 




QUAKER MEETINGS. 

Yea ! I fell in the pit of love, 

With a ti turn tij 
The Spirit then began to move, 

With a ti turn ti. 
Quoth I, " Fair maiden, ne'er deride, 
For verily, when thou'rt my bride, 
Lo ! I will cleave unto thy side," 

-With a ti turn ti. 
" Behold," said Ruth, " there is a grove. 

With a ti turn ti ; 
Where birds, called turtles, coo and love/ 

With a ti turn ti. 
Lo ! then I thought her truly mine ; 
But when of love she gave this sign, 
She proved a cruel Phi-lis-tine, 

With a ti turn ti. 
For she another suitor had, 

With a ti turn ti, 
Profanely called a flashy lad, 

With a ti turn ti ; 
And when I reached the grove assigned, 
He came before I Ruth could find, 
And kicked me ruth-less-ly behind, 

With a toe turn ti. 



l\e^-L«i^'lA ■' * uiiily olecimg on KOCoiid day I"' " wl "f 
tho secnd Sixth day in Sixth month, at Newport, It. t- 

The Yearly Meeting for the State of New- York, and 
( parta adjacent, on second day following the fourth fiwlday 
in Fifth month, at !Vew York. 
Philadelphia Year I j Meeting, on the third Second day r 

Tenth month. Haltimore Yearly Meeting, on the last Second day in Tenth month. 

Ohio Yearly Meeting, en second day following the first Fir«tday in ninth month 
fkasai't, Jefferson County. 





CAFE COD AND GAY HEAD. 

Cape Cod, so called from the multitude of cod-fish which are found on its coast, 
s composed almost entirely of sand, and is 70 miles long. Cape Cod is a nursery 
for seamen, and in that view is an important place. Fishing", either at sea in 
vessels or round the shores in boats, is the whole employment of all the inhabit- 
ants ; and the boys as soon as they can pull a cod-fish, are put on board a vessel 
The girls on this cape are the handsomest that are to be found on the continent 
of America. The Cows feed mostly on fish, which they devour with great expe 
ditioH, by placing the foot on the fish and stripping the flesh off with their teeth 
South from this cape is situated 

Gay Head, a kind of peninsula on Martha's Vineyard, composed of red ochre 

and colored earth, which gives it 
a very lively appearance. The 
inhabitants use the ochre to paint 
their houses. There are one or 
two extinguished volcanoes on 
this place. Formerly lights used 
to be seen in the night, and whale- 
men used to steer their course by 
the lights on this Headi 




#*Ki 



CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. 



The Cape of Good Hope is the 
most southern extremity of the 
continent of Africa. The town is 
neat and well built, the nouses are 
all white. The ground behind the 
town gradually rises on all sides 
towards the 'Table Mountain. 
_ This mountain is always covered 
|p> with a thick cloud several hours 
before a gale, which is called the 
devil's table cloth. It is an infal- 
lible sign that the wind will blow 
strong off share within twelve 
hours. . 



1st Month. 



JANUARY hath 31 days. 



1835. 



Walk now among- the forest trees- — 

Saidst thou that they were slript and bare? 
Each heavy bough is bending dovv-u 
With snowy leaves and flowers — the crown 
Which Winter regally doth wear. 



ASPKOHOM2CAL CALCULATIONS. 



yj Dys. i). m.. Dya. u. m. Dys. d. m. 



© 



23 3 

22 58 

22 53 

22 47 

22 49 

22 33 



7 

8 

9 

10 

11 



22 26 

22 18 

22 10 

22 2 

21 53 



12 121 43 



13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 



21 33 

21 23 

21 12 

21 1 

20 50 



Dys. d. m 



Dys. 



251 25 

20 131 26 

20 Oj 27 

19 46 28 

19 33 29 



20 38i 24 1 19 18' 30 



19 4 

18 49 

18 34 

18 18 

18 2 

17 46 





mooiSi's phases. 






D. H. M. 


D. H. M. 


p First Quarter, 


6 4 56a. I d Last Quarter, 


21 4 12a. 


O Full Moon, 


14 4 32a. 1 New Moon, 


28 4 27a. 



3 3 



Th. 

F 

Sa. 

Su. 

M. 

Tu. 

W. 

Th. 

F. 

Sa. 

Su. 

M. 

Tu. 

W. 

Th. 

F. 

Sa. 

Su. 

M. 

Tu. 

VV. 

Th. 

F. 

Sa. 

Su. 

M. 

Tu. 

W. 

Th. 

F. 

Sa. 



Sun 
rises, sets. 



S.slovr Moon 
m. s. South. 



30 4 33 
30 4 39 
30;4 40 
30;4 40 
30 4 41 
304 42 
30J4 43 
394 44 
304 45 
30 4 46 
294 47 
29 4 4S 
7 29|4 49 
2814 50 



4 51 
4 53 



7 

7 

7 

7 

7 26| 4 55 

7 254 57 

244 58 
7 23 4 59 

23 5 

22 5 
7 215 

20 5 

205 

19 5 
7 18 5 
7 17 5 
7 16 5 
7 15,5 12 



264 54 

3 1 



43 
11 
39 
7 
34 
l 

6 27 

6 53 

18 

43 

7 

31 

54 

16 

9 37 

9 58 

10 19 

10 38 

10 57 



12 20 
12 35 

12 48 

13 1 
13 13 
13 24 
13 35 
13 44 



21 
13 

59 

43 

2G 

5 

6 U 



9 46 

10 39 

11 34 

8 
29 



25 
19 
11 


49 

5 38 

6 29 
21 
16 



7 
8 
9 14 

10 13 

11 12 



Moon 
R. S. 



7 12 

8 18 

9 22 

10 25 

11 26 
Morn. 

26 

1 26 

2 27 

3 29 

4 32 

5 33 
Rises. 

4 36 

5 44 

6 55 

8 7 

9 20 

10 33 

11 46 
M orn. 

1 

2 14 

3 28 

4 40 

5 41 
Sets. 

4 48 

5 57 

7 5 

8 IV 



High 
Water. 



53 

1 34 

2 17 

3 00 

3 41 

4 26 

5 11 

6 02 

7 01 

8 06 

9 12 
10 05 

10 51 

11 32 
Mom. 

10 

53 

1 35 

2 21 

3 08 

3 51 

4 39 

5 29 

6 40 

8 03 

9 21 

10 21 

11 15 
01 

40 

1 18 



Aspects, Holy days. 
Wiftd, Weather, &c. 



e. High tides. Q\n P- 

w - (55^ g Oc? 
s. Bat.Princeton'77. 
s, w. Bundling on 
8. s. w. Cape Cod 
w. s. w. Epiphany. 
s. e. Very Low Tides. 
s.s,e. J) in Apogee, 
w. about tMs time. 
s. E. £ J) 21 
e. Stamp Act, '65. 
w. A stinger. 

s. 6 J> c? a O h 

s. Cattle kick. 

e. Middling Tides. 
s. e. Severe 

e. Bat. Cowpens. 
jn. e. snow drifts . 

S. e. Cood skating. 

*• 6 J> h 

s.vv. Tides quite Low 
n. w. D In Perigee. 
h. e. Pitt died 1806. 
s. w. Showers. 

w. 6 3) 9 

s. w. Sup. £ £ 
e. 8nwky. 

s. w. High tides. 

If. E. <$ 3) $[ 

s. e. Gravy 

s. s. e. cools quick 



*mm 



II <\u 1 I ' 



■ ii'WML ' J P J 



2d Month. 



FEBRUARY hath 28 days. 



1835. 



The sun peeps through the window-pane, 
Which children mark with laughing eye, 

And in the wet street steal again, 
To tell each other Spring is nigh. 



ASTRONOMICAL CALCULATIONS. 



Tu 



© 



Dys. 


D. M. 


Dys. 


D. M. 


Dys. 


E>. M. 


Dys. 


D. M. 


Dys. 


1 


17 13 


7 


15 26 


13 


13 29. 1 Jl 25 


25 


2 


16 56 


8 


15 7 


14 


13 9 


20 11 4 


26 


3 


16 38 


9 


14 48 


15 


12 4!) 


21 


10 42 


27 


4 


16 21 


10 


14 29 


16 


12 28 


22 


10 20 


28 


5 


16 3 


11 


14 9 


17 


12 7 


23 


9 5J 




6 


15 44 


12 


13 49 


18 


11 46 


24 


9 37 





D. M. 

"JTT4 
8 bi 
8 30 
8 7 



MOON'S PHASES. 



First Quarter, 5 
Full Moon, 13 



H. M. - D. H. H. 

2 51a. I tfLast Quarter, 20 8m. 
6 15m. J New Moon, 27 7 44m. 



iSu. 
2M. 
3Tu. 
4W. 

5 |rh. 

6f 



! Son S.slow. 
jRises, Sets.JM. s. 
|7 



7 

8 

9 

10 

II 

12 



Su. 
M 

Tu. 
W 

Th. 
13F. 
14Sa. 

15,^>- 

16.M 

ITJ'I'rt. 

law. 

IK'fh 

20 P. 

21 Sa. 
22'Su. 

pan. 

24Tu. 
.25 W. 

26Th. 

27.P. 
28 Sa. 



Jw 6 
6 
6 



145 
135 
125 

U P 

95 

85 
75 
65 
55 
45 

is 

15 
05 
535 
575 
555 
545 
525 
515 
505 
485 
475 
455 
445 



42 
41 
39 
37 



Moon I Moon 
South. R. S. 



1413 53 

1514 1 

1614 

1814 

1914 

2014 

2214 

2314 

2514 

2614 

2714 

2814 

3014 

3114 

3214 

3314 

3414 

3514 

3714 

3814 

4013 58 

41 13 50 

4213 42 

4413 34 

4513 25 

4613 15 



8 
14 
19 

24 

27 
30 
32 
33 

34; 

33 
32 

30 
28 
25 
21 
16 
10 
4 



9 11 



High | Aspects, Holydays, 
Water.' Wind, Weather, &c. 



1 55 s. w. A pair of 



10 12 2 30 s. s. w. Hurricanes 



11 13 



5 2ljMorn 

6 3 14, 



3 4e. Sp.Inq.abol.1813 

3 37 n. w. ]) In Apogee, 

4 I5>\ Very Low Tides. 



47 
48 



13 4 
12 54 



6 48; 1 16: 4 53 if. w. £ j> % 

7 36j 2 18 5 44 s. b. A white 

8 261 3 201 6 57;s. w. squall. 

9 20 4 20 8 19 n. e. <j J> $ 

10 16 5 17: 9 34s. w. Earthquake. 

11 12 Rises. 10 28 w. Voltaire b. 1694 
S I 4 3611 15 s. k. Muddy. 

8 5 50 Morn. s. Very high tides. 

1 2 7 5 OSeptuagesima Sund. 

1 54! 8 20 39 w. Qf 

2 44 9 35 1 20s. w. J> in Perigee. 
3 w. 6 3> h 

4 1 e. Whirlwind*. 

3 23 s. e. Sunshine. 

4 9 w. Tides quite Low. 

5 0e. D0| 
38 6 lls.s.E. Coolish. 
38 7 45s. E . <$ J 9 

9 12 s. w. Sap runs 
6 910 19s. e. fast. 

3) sets 11 7s. Tides quite high. 

5 5611 49s. Ear'qatLisl»on'y6. 

6 59 25s. s. e. 4 J) $ 



3 3410 50 2 

4 25 Mom. 2 

5 18 5 
' 1 



6 12 

7 
8 
9 



10 



10 53 

11 43 

30 

1 13 



20 
2 32 
3 
4 
5 29 



3d month. 



MARCH hath 31 days. 



1835. 



The little brooks run on in light, 

As if they had a chace of mirth ; 
The skies are blue, the air is warm, 
Our very hearts have caught the charm 
That sheds a beauty over earth. 



ASTRONOMICAL CALCULATIONS. 



• IDys. d. m. Dys. d. m. Dys. p. m. Dys. p. m. Dys. p. m. 



© 



44 
21 

59 
36 
12 

49 



7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 



I 5 20 
5 3 



3 29 



13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
IB 



1 3 51 19 


1 43 


25 


2 42 


20 


20 


26 


2 18 


N.2J 


N. 4 


27 


1 54 


22 


28 


28 


1 31 


23 


51 


29 


1 7 


24 


1 15 


30 



MOON'S PHASES. 

P. H. M. P. H. M. 

J> First Quarter, 7 11 23w. I D Last Quarter, 21 8 42m. 

Q Full Moon, 14 5 2U. | # New Moon, 28 11 58 1. 



# c I Sun iS.slow. 
3 Rises, Sets.M. s. 



Su. 
M. 
Tu. 
W. 
5Th. 
F. 
Sa. 
Su. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9M. 
lOTu, 
11W. 
12,Th. 
13F. 
14,Sa. 
15Su. 
16 M. 
!7Tu. 



6 355 50112 42 
6 345 51 12 30 
6 325 5212 18 
6 315 5412 5 
6 295 5511 51 



18 



20 
21 
22 



23 M 



24 



W. 



l9Th. 



F. 



Tu, 



30 M 



31 



6 285 56 
6 265 57 
6 255 59 
6 23.6 
6 216 
6 196 
176 
6 156 
6 146 
6 126 
6 106 
96 
76 10 



6 

Su.6 



25 W 
26Th. 



F. 

Sa. 
Su. 



Moon 
South. 



Moon 
R. S 



1 55 

2 36 

3 16 

3 58 



4 42 Morn. 



56 11 

36 12 

26 14 

06 15 
596 17 
576 18 
556 19 
536 20 
526 21 
506 22 
496 23 
476 24 4 43 



11 38 

11 23 

11 8 

10 53 

10 38 

10 22 

10 6 

9 49 

9 32 

9 15 

8 58 

8 4 

8 2: 

8 5 

7 47 

7 29 

7 11 

6 52 

6 34 

6 15 

5 57 

5 38 

5 20 

5 



i 



5 28 

6 16 

7 8 

8 2 

8 57 

9 52 

10 47 

11 40 

8 

32 

1 24 

2 16 



Aspects, Holydays 
Wind, Weather, &• 





1 

2 
3 
3 58 



4 43 

5 23 
rises. 
5 56 

7 13 

8 31 

9 50 
1011 7 

6Morn. 

23 

1 34 

2 35 

3 28 

4 11 
4 46 



Tu.t5 456 25 4 25 



5 3 


6 2 


7 


7 56 


8 50 


9 40 


10 27 


11 10 


11 52 


33 


1 13 


1 55 



High 
water. 

58!s. s. w. Shrove Suncf. 

1 29 n. Hares 

2 On. run mad. 
2 31 e. J in Ap. Ash. Wed 

2 57 s.e. Boston M're.'70. 

3 28 s. s. e. Very drowsy 

4 9 e. Very Low Tides. 
4 55 s. w. weather. 

6 9 n. w. Crows grow 

7 41 s. e. black and 

9 ,2w. girls ticklish 
10 In. e. about this time, 

10 53 s. w. Disc.. Her. '81. 

11 38 w. Very High Tides. 
Morn.N. Jackson h. '67. 

20 n. e. J) in Perigee. 

1 2 s. w. St. Patrick. 



1 43 n. e. High winds. 

2 20 s. w. Fleas begin 

2 59 n. to bite. 

3 46 e. Tides quite Low. 

4 45 s. e. Newton d. '27. 

6 1 w. Tremendous 

7 32n.w. Gale 
9 3s. e. Lady Day. 

5 15 10 8 s. w. with high 

5 40; 10 53 s. e. winds. 



sets 

6 52 

7 53 

8 54 



1 1 29 e. Tides rather High. 
4's. w. Sun flies 

35;e. s. e. low. 

1 l|fi. w. }>in Apogee. 




"HERE I AND SORROW S>T." [thifapeare.] 

(See Comic Token.) 



" Pray, sir," said a young Chinese, learning English, to his tutor, 
"am I raw when my clothes are off?" " Not unless you have rub- 
bed your,skin off— tell me why you ask ?" He opened a Dictionary, 
and pointefl to Raw, Undressed. 

A horse jockey once selling a nag to a gentleman, frequently ob- 
served, with emphatic 
earnestness, thathe was 
an honest horse. Why. 
sir, replied the seller, 
whenever I rode him he 
always threatened to 
throw me, and he cer 
tainly never deceived 
me. 



Three thing's only are 
well done in haste: flying- 
from the plajrue, escaping 
quarrels, and catching 
fleas. 




FANCY PORTRAIT— Capt. HEAD. 




THE SHEEP.SHEARERS' SONG. 

Our sheep-shearing over, surround the gay board, 

With hearts full of pleasure and glee ; 
And while we partake of its plentiful hoard, 

Who so blithe and so happy as we ? 

From that staple, the wool, all our consequence springs: 
It a freedom secures both to freemen and kings, 

It guards us awake, and preserves us asleep, 

Night and day, then thank heaven, that gave us the sheep. 

When bleak piercing winter comes on with a frown,' 
Frost and snow clogging hedge, ditch, and stile, 

Annoying alike, both the country and town, 
Wrapt in wool we look round us and smile. 

Did we sing in its praises from evening to morn, 

'T would our gratitude only increase : 
The dying old man, and the infant new-born, 

Are both kept alive by its fleece. 
Then how, with the truth, a fair pace can we keep, 
When in warmest expressions we speck of the sheep? 
" My dear duck, said a Hibernian 
lady to her lover, a countryman of 
hers, "I had a swate drame about 
yourself the last night that ever was.' ; 
" And tell't me honey," said Pat with" 
eagerness. "The divil mind i? e, if 1~ 

do." " And by the p< wers, if ye don't A Oure for Sheep & 
the next time ye are drameing swate, I'll be after listening, 




m «J 



4th Month. 



APRIL hath 30 days. 



1835. 



The primrose bud, springs early pledge, 
Sprouts 'neath each woodland tree, 

And rivlets under every hedge 
Prepare a seat for thee. 



ASTRONOMICAL CALCULATIONS. 



Dys. 



Dys. 



D. M. 



Dys. 



D. M. 



Dys. d. m. Dys. d. m 



4 231 7 1 


4 46 


8 


5 9 


9 


5 32 


10 


5 55 


11 


6 17 


12 



I 6 401 13 18 53 19 11 II 25 H3~3 



14 
15 



7 2 

7 25 

7 471 16 

8 9 17 

8 3l| 18 



9 15 


20 


11 2. 


26 


13 22 


9 37 


21 


11 4 


27 


13 42 


9 58 


22 


12 3 


28 


14 1 


10 19 


23 


12 23 


29 


14 20 


10 40 


24 


J2 43 


30 


14 38 



MOON'S PHASES. 



ft First 
QFull 



Quarter, 6 4 47m. 
Moon, 13 2 32m. 



Sun |S.slow.| Moon 
iRises, Sets.U. s. South. 



fl Last Quarter, 
<9 New Moon, 



19 6 29a. 
27 4 36a 



Moon ! High 
R. S. Water 



WT 5 436 261 4 6j 2 38 



1 

2iTh 
3 



l5 42,6 27! 3 48J 3 22 



IF. 
4Sa. 
5Su. 
6M. 
7Tu. 
8W. 
9,Th. 
10F. 
11 Sa. 
12Su. 
13M. 
l4Tu. 

isw. 

l6Th. 

17JF. 

18'Sa. 

19jSu. 

20jM. 

2lTu 

22W. 

23|Th. 

24 F. 

25Sa. 

«6Su. 

27: M. 

S;9 ! ,W. 
SKNTb 



2 54 
2 37 
2 19 

2 2 



406 28 3 30 

38,6 29 3 12 

366 30' 

3416 31 

32J6 32 

3V6 33 
|5 29,6 34 
5 27J6 35 

26'6 36 

246 37 

236 38 

216 39 
|5 196 40 
5 186 41 
|5 166 42 
jo 14!6 43 
j5 136 44 
|S 116 45 

106 47 
8;6 48 
66 49 



4 10 

5 

5 52 

6 45 

7 39 

8 32 



9 59; 1 29 

10 59| 1 58 

11 58 2 27 
Mom. 2 55 



Holydays, Aspects, 
Wind, Weather, &c. 



n. e. J In Apogee. 
s. e. Jefferson b. '43 

6 <L X 6 9 * 

s. w. Rawish. 

56 3 88k s. w. A Harricane. 

1 50 4 25 ( s. Low tides £ ^> $ 

2 38 5 39|s. e. n $ O 

3 19 7 7 1*. e. Stiff Breezes. 

3 54 8 32s. w. Hot Nights. 

4 25 9 37s. g © ^ 
1 ll|ll 9| rises. 10 26|n. Canning b. '70. 

6 211 lOJPalm Sun. £ J) ^ 

7 2311 53 n. C In Perigee. 

55 8 44Morn. n. Veiy High Tides. 

1 5210 4| 36 e. Shaks. b. 1564. 

2 5011 19 1 17 s. Snow Squalls. 



1 45| 9 25 



1 2810 17 
1 lllll 

55i g 
39! 1 
23 

8 
Fast. 7 
22 
36 
50 



3 51 Morn. 

4 52 27 



5 51 
1 3 6 47 
1 16 7 38 
1 29 8 25 
1 4l| 9 10 



1 26 

2 13 

2 50 

3 21 

3 47 

4 10 



5|6 50 1 52 9 52 

36 52i 2 410 32 4 30 

26 53 2 1411 13! 4 51 

16 54 2 2411 53 sets. It 32 

4 596 56 2 34 36| 7 50 J 

4 58-6 57 2 43 1 20- 8 50, 2? 

.14 566 58l 2 52l 2 6 9 50i 54 



1 58 w. e. Good Friday. 

2 41 s. e. Light Dust. 

3 32s.w. Easter Sunday. 

4 29 is\ w. Rather Feverish 

5 45 n. e. Great Rains. 

7 16 vv. s. (j])9 

8 40 n. 6 D 9 

9 41 Tides quite low. 
10 27 x. e. Very agreeable. 
! i lis. w. Low Sunday. 



Tides rather high. 
n. d In Apogee. 
n. e. Snowy. 
e. n. e. <$ J) 21 



5th month. 



MAY hath 31 days. 



1835- 



The trees still deepen in their bloom, 
Grass greens the meadow lands, 

And flowers with every morning come, 
As dropt by fairy hands. 



ASTRONOMICAL CALCULATIONS. 

• |Dys. d. m. Dys. i». m. Dys. d. m. Dys. d. m. Dys. 



~2u~32 
21 3 
21 14 
21 24 
21 33 
21 43 



I© 



14 571 

15 15 
15 33 

15 50 

16 8 
16 25 



1 7 


16 42 


I 13 


18 16 


8 


16 58 


14 


18 31 


9 


17 14 


15 


18 46 


10 


17 30 


16 


19 


11 


17 46 


17 


19 14 


IS 


18 1 


18 


19 27 



20 
21 
22 
23 
24 



19 401 25 
26 



19 53 

20 6 

20 18 

20 30 

20 41 



27 

28 
29 
30 



MOON'S PHASES. 

D. H. M. D. H. M. 

d First Quarter, 5 5 59a. I fl Last Quarter, 19 5 55m. 

Q Full Moon, 12 10 29m. | # New Moon, 27 8 48m. 




Holydays, Aspects, 
Wind, Weather, &c. 



s.s.e. Addison b.1672 
w. Good Weather 
w. for Goblins. 
n. w. £ J) $ 
9 Very Low Tides. 
n. e. Old Ladies 
s. grow talkative. 
s. e. Very Muddy. 

N. E. <$ J) >2 

s. w. Boys full 

n. n. w. of Mischief 

J>in Perigee. Very 

High Tides. 
s. Calves fat 

57 In. very fast 

1 43 n. e. this spring. 

2 29;Sup. 6 g © 

3 21 |s. e. Squally 

f* n. e. with a great 
6 43 Tides quite Low. 

Smoke. 

Rogation Sunday. 
n. <£ In Apogee. 
w. Girls not 

s. ©ec. Invisible. 
Ascension Day. 
Tides rather High. 
x. Pope died, 1744. 
1 42|n. e. to be got at. 



OUT OF DANGER. 
' Why, Tom, adzooks ! 
These mournful looks ? 
Why thus lo joy a stranger ? 
Your wife 's not dead V 
He shook his head : 
«Oh ! no, she's out of danger/ 



SYMPATHY. 

A Doctor and an Undertaker met ; 
They spoke of illness, fees of trade, and debt : 
And well they might, for such a dismal day 
Never was known for coughs and deaths to-day. 
Parting in fog they both exclaimed together, 
1 Good morning t 7 ye ; this is rare coffin weather.' 




" AS TIGHT AS A BRISTLE." 

These mischievous youths, in their frolics one day, when their 
father was at work in his shop, fastened the door, and set fire to 
the building — determined to smoke him out. But he burst through 
the window, and with his neighbors' assistance gave the young 
dogs a good cowhidiftg. Spurzheim says that the offspring of shoe- 
makers are generally girls. It would be better to have all girls 
than such boys as these. A shoemaker is generally a good tem- 
pered fellow, full of " fun and notions." A great genius in this art, 
once made great inventions : one was an expeditious and profitable 
jway of making shoes ; which was by taking an axe and chopping off 
the tops of ready made boots. He next solved the problem of walk 
ing on the water, he invited a large number to witness his first 
essay. He stepped boldly upon the waves equipped in a pair of 
bulky cork boots : but it soon appeared that he had not pondered 
sufficiently on the subject of centre of gravity and of flotation, for 
in the next instant all that was to be seen of hira was a pair of legs 




If la bod me laugh, in bed me cry ; 
And, bom in bed, in bed me die *. 
I The near approach a bed may show, 
Of human bti»s and human wo. 



A modern Pry one day "dropp'd in," 

Whila dinner was about, 

Hoped ■• no offence." His friend replied, 

"Ob, nonet" so just dropped out. 



54* 




CAP-A-PEA. 

I consider the kitchen garden as of very considerable im 
jtoortance, as pot-herbs, sallads, and roots of various kinds are 
useful. Having a plenty of them at hand, a family will not be 
so likely to eat too much meat, which is an error too common 
n this country. It is best that a garden should be on a de- 
clivity. If it be very steep it may^be thrown into banks and 
level plats. There rs 
commonly a variety ot 
soils on a declivity of 
any considerable ex- 
tent. This will give 
a material advantage 
to a garden, as a va- 
riety of different plants 
may have each the soil that 
best suits them. 

BUSS PINE. 







A CHINESE TEA-GARDEN. 

For the gratification of old ladies, we have introduced the follow- 
ing view drawn by a Chinese artist named Hum. 

Tea was first brought to Europe by the Portuguese, who not un- 
derstanding its qualities or mode of preparing it, the leaves were 
boiled, served up as greens, and eat with melted butter; the water 
in which they were boiled being thrown away. 

The Tea shrub is a branchy evergreen about the height tf five 

orsix feet. The stem is af an ash 

color, towards the top taking a 
reddish hue; the branches grow 
alternate, but are placed in no 
regular order. The leaves are 
smooth and glossy, of a shining 
green color, and of a firm tex- 
ture. ■ 

The first crop of leaves is 
gathered during the third year 
latter sowing the seed. They 
|are then abundant and in their 
prime. 

The leaves are usually gath- 
ered singly ; sometimes, how- 
ever, whole sprigs are plucked. 
One person can pluck from six 
to ten pounds of leaves per day. 

STORKS AND LEAVE S. 

■■■■■■— ——ii— — — — — • I^^— ^ 



AGRICULTURE. 




Manure is of the same importance to the farmer, that the stock in 
trade is to the merchant. It is of the first importance for the farm 
er to distribute the manure over his fields in the spring, especially 
where the cattle have been kept during the winter. This is clout 
by taking a small beetle in the hand, and separating the pieces intc 
minute particles. The land is thus fertilized either by increasing 
the quantity of vegetable food in the soil, or by preparing the nour 
ishment already contained in the soil, to enter the roots of plants 
The wisdom o" Providence is not more manifest in the example- 
shown mankind in the economy and industry of the bee, thin it is in 
the case of the Tumble Dung Beetle, (Scavabcsus pihil ftvius, L. I. 
N. N.) Observe what an example they set the farmer in their in 
dustry and mutually assisting each other in rolling their globular 
balls from the place where they made them, to that of their inti r- 
ment, which is usually the distance of some yards. This they per- 
form breech foremost, by raising their hind parts and forcing along 
the ball with their hind feet. Two o*r three of them are sometimes 




Tumble Dung Beetles. 



6th Month. 



JUNE hath 30 days. 



1835. 



The season now is all del'ght, 
Sweet smile the passing hours, 

And summer's pleasures, at their height. 
Are sweet as are her flowers. 



ASTRONOMICAL CALCULATIONS. 



. iDys. d. m. Dys. d. m. Dys. d. m. Dys. d. m. Dys. d. m. 



123 25 

23 24 

23 22 

23 20 

23 17 

23 14 



1 
2 

4 

5 
6 



22 16 

22 23 

22 30 

22 37 



7 


22 431 


8 


22 49 


9 


22 54 


10 


22 59 


11 


23 4 


12 


23 8 



13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 



23 121 19 



23 15 

23 18 

23 21 

23 23 

23 25 



20 

21 

22 

23' 

24 



23 261 

23 27 

23 28 

23 28 

23 27 

23 27 



25 

26 
27 

28 
29 
30 



MO ON'S PHASES. 

D. H. M. D. H. M. 

D First Quarter, 4 3 21m. I » Last Quarter, 17 7 22a. 

O Full Moon, 10 6 Ia. | # New Moon, 25 11 37a. 



M. 
2Tu 

W. 
4Th, 

F. 



Sun 
Rises, Sets 

4 
4 



6Sa. 
7Su. 
8M. 
9,Tu. 

W. 

Th. 

F. 

Sa. 

Su. 



10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 M. 

16Tu. 



17 



W. 



18Th 



F. 

Sa. 
Su. 
M. 



3Tu 

24 W. 

25 Th 

26 F. 

27 Sa. 
38 Su. 

29 M. 

30 Tu. 



25 
24 

24 
23 
23 
23 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
23 
24 
24 
24 
25 
25 
25 
26 



29 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
33 
34 
35 
35 
36 
37 
37 
38 
38 



SunF 



2 38 
2 29 
2 19 
2 10 
2 
1 49 



53 
41 
29 
17 
4 



38slow.8 



21 
34 
47 




13 
26 



1 39 



52 
5 
18 
30 
43 
55 
8 



Moon Moon. High I Holidays, Anpects, 
South. R. S. Water. Wind, Weather, &c. 



4 19 



5 10 Mom. 



5 59 

6 48 

7 36 

8 25 

9 17 

10 13 

11 12 

15 



11 54 



19 
21 
20 
14 
3 
48 

6 30 

7 11 

7 51 

8 33 

9 15 
10 

10 48 

11 38 

30) 

1 23 

2 16 

3 7 
3 57 



26 

55 

1 21 

1 46 

2 12 
2 40 
rises. 

7 43 

8 53 

9 55 

10 43 

11 22 
11 54 
Morn. 

19 

41 

1 

1 

1 

2 

2 

3 



22 
5 

59 
1 



2 
23 
45 

9 
35 

7 
sets. 

8 29 

9 16 
9 56 

1030 
10 59 



a- w. <j J $ 
s. e. Very Hot. 

S. 8. E. g Q f 

n.e. Low Tides. 
w. w. Bonifice. 

6 T>h 

s. s. E.Whit Sunday. 

n. e. Cooler. 

v.w. }) in Perigee. 
11 6js.j)ee. in vis. g J© 
Morn. s. e. High Tides. 
s. w. Frosty. 



2 
3 
3 
5 

6 11 

7 23 

8 29 

9 2L 
10 12 



46 

1 31 
217 

3 8 



59 
51 
50 



6 53 

7 56 

8 53 

9 41 

10 22 

11 1 
11 40 

16 

52 

1 30 

2 12 



s. w. Cloudy. 

w. Trinity Sunday. 

■• <$#©• 6 J>W 
s. s. e. White Squall. 
n. w. Bat. Wat. '13 
n.n.w. Low Tides. 
s. w. Pine Weather 
s. for chickens. 
n. e. Summer begins. 
n. w. <£ in Apogee. 
4 J&.Reg.£ 3>? 
s. E.St. John Baptist 
s. w. Dry Storm. 
w.Tides rather High. 
n. Clear Evenings. 
n. e. Wm. IV.ded. k 
s. St. Peter. 
"• o 3><? 



*•• 



7th Month. 



JULY hath 31 days. 



1835. 



While waking birds betake to flight 
From off each roosting bough, 

While nature's locks are wet with n\ght, 
How sweet to wander now ! 



ASTIIONOIIICAL CALCULATIONS. 


25 


Dys. d. m. Dys. d. m. Dys. d. m. Dys. ©. m. Dys. 


D. M. 




1 


23 10 


7 


22 40 


13 121 55 


19 


r20 58 


25 


19 47 


d 


2 


23 6 


8 


22 33 


14 


21 47 


20 


20 47 


26 


19 34 




4> 


3 


23 1 


9 


22 27 


15 


21 38 


21 


20 36 


27 


19 21 


a 


4 


22 57 


10 


22 19 


16 


21 28 


22 


20 24 


28 


19 7 


X 


5 


22 51 


11 


22 12 


17 


21 18 


23 


20 12 


29 


18 53 


& 


<i 22 46 


12 


22 4 18 


21 8 24 20 


30 


18 39 



MOOD'S PHASES. 

D. H. M. t>. H. M. 

J First Quarter, 3 9 57m. I ' tf Last Quarter, 17 11 0m. 

Q Full Moon, 10 1 53m. | 9 New Moon, 25 30a. 



San 

Rises, Sets. 



SunS. 



lAV.i4 267 40 

2,Th.]4 267 40 

3|F. 4 27 7 40 

4;Sa.U 277 39 

5S". 4 287 39 

6M. 4 29|7 39 

71T...4 307 39 



8VV. 
m. 

10.F. 

USa. 
l2'Su.'4 



4 31 
4 32 

4 



13,M 
14Tu. 

law 

16Th.4 



307 38 
7 38 
7 38 
337 37 
33:7 37 
34l7 36 
357 38 
36J7 35 
377 34 



17 F. 4 387 34 

l8',Sa.4 397 33 

19Su.4 397 32 

2031. 4 407 32 



21Tu. 

22W. 

23;Th. 

24|F. 
25 Sa. 

Su. 

M. 



4 41 
4 42 



29 



31 



26 

27 
28Tu. 



W. 



30Th. 



F. 



31 
30 



437 29 



7 28 
7 27 



4617 26 



4 47 



4 51 



7 25 
4 487 24 
4 497 23 6 
4 507 22 

7 2 



3 19 
3 31 
3 42 

3 53 

4 4 
4 15 
4 25 
4 34 
4 44 

4 53 

5 1 



Moon 
South. 



Moon 
R. S. 



4 4511 24 



5 3211 48 

6 20 Morn 



7 9 

8 1 

8 57 

9 56 



High 
Water. 



2 57 

3 46 

4 38 

5 35 

6 39 

7 43 

8 56 



5 24 

5 30 
5 37 
5 42 
5 48 
5 52 

5 57 

6 
6 

6 
6 

6 9 
6 10 



12 

38 

1 9 
1 46 

10 59 Rises. 10 
g j 7 3910 59 

2 8 3411 53 

1 3 9 18Morn. 

2 9 52 41 

2 5210 19i 1 24 

3 4010 43| 2 6 

4 24 



Holydays, Aspects, 
Wind, Weather, &c. 



s. w. ©in Apogee. 

x. Sultry. 

Low Tides. ^ ]) ^ 

x. w. Dusty. 

n. e. Independence. 

Algiers, t. '30. 
s. (£ in Perigee. 
s. e. Warm forenoons 

N. W. □ © 12 

w. High Tides. Hot. 

Very Fogey. 
s. s. v.. 'Agreeable. 

NT. N. L(j)9 fogS. 

s. w. Bastile. d. '89 
11 5 2 49|s.e. & $21 
11 26 3 SQf-dgreeablt. drizzling 
4 12 w. Inf. <$ofg even. 
4 51 Very Low Tides. 
11 5 37xN.e.e. 3> In Apogee. 

36 6 36is. e. Very muggy. 

1 61 7 44 ! x. Harricane. 

1 41 8 55s. w. Magdalen, dog 

2 25 9 50J 4 J> 2,1 6 T> 9 
Sets. |10 40;n. e. days begin. 

7 5511 23 s. s. e. St. James. 

8 32 2n.e. High Tides. 
n. w. clouds fly low. 
s. w. ^ D $ 
s. Penu d. 1718. 
n. e. Sunny. 



5 4811 48 

6 29 Morn. 

7 11 

7 55 

8 41 

9 31 

10 23 

11 J6 

10 

1 2 
1 53 



6 10 1 53 9 2j 42 

6 10 2 42 9 29 1 21 

3 30j 9 54; 2 2 

81 4 1810 19: 2 44 



6 10 43! 3 23*. s. e. 4 J> h 



mgmmm 



engaged in trundling one ball, which, from meeting with impedi- 
ments on account of the uneaveness of the ground is sometimes de- 
serted by them. It is, however, attempted by others with success, 
unless it happens to roll into some deep hollow or chink, where 
they are constrained to leave it: but they continue their work by 
rolling off the next ball that comes in their way. None of them 
3eem to know their own balls, but an equal care for the whole ap- 
pears to affect the whole community. 

They form these pellets while the dung remains moist, and leave 
them to harden in the sun before they attempt to roll them. In their 
removing them from place to place, both they and the balls may 
frequently be seen tnmbling about over the little eminences that are 
in their way. They are not easily discouraged ; and by repeating 
their attempts, usually surmount the difficulties. So intent are they 
always upon their employment, that, though handled or otherwise 
interrupted, they are not to be deterred, but immediately on being 
freed, persist in their work. They are so strong* as to move about 
with the greatest ease, things that are many times their weight. 
Dr. Brickell was supping one evening in a planter's house of North 
Carolina, when two of them were conveyed, without, his knowledge, 
under the candlestick. A few blows were struck on the table, and 
to his great surprise the candlestick began to move about, aoparent 
ly without any agency ; and his suprise was not mucn lessened 
when, on taking one of them up, he discovered that it was one of 
these beetles that moved. 



AGRICULTURE. 



23 



Lor ! ! Mr. Butters, I hope I wish I was a little fly, 
you aint in fun 1 On my love's bosom for to Ke! 




INi^rUATION. 



A bountiful Providence has^ plentifully furnished us with matter 

fur furnishing our tables. But though "the Lord sends us meat, yet 

the devil does cooks." To remedy the truth of this proverb we 

hail give a few directions for cooking. 




\ 



To stew a Round of Beef 
boil it till it is more than 
half enough, then take it 
up and peel off the skin ; 
take salt, pepper, beaten' 
mace, grated nutmeg, pars- 
ley, and other herbs, shred 
and stuff them in large 
holes through the fat, and 
lay the rest of the season- 
ing all over the top, and 
spread over it the yolk of 
an jegg or two to bind it 
on. Save the gravy that 
runs out while you are 
stuffing it, and put to it a 
pint of claret and some 
vinegar ; put it into a deep 
pan, so fit for it that the 
liquor will fill it up to the 
top ; let it bake for two 
A ROUND OP BEEF. hours, then put it into 
dish, and pour the liquor it was baked in all over it. 

A Flounder Pie is good eating. Take the fish and cut off their 
fins, and scorch them ; season them well with salt, peper and nut- 
megs, then strew some chopped onions over the bottom of the pie, 
then lay on your flounders, with the yolks of eggs and butter close 
up your pie and bake it. 

Fried Moshrooms are cooked best by tossing the mushrooms up 
in a stew-pan, with a little broth to take off the bitterness, then 
strew over them fine salt, pepper, and flour, and fry with butter 
they are fine with meat of any kind. 

There are many kinds of meat which are not generally eat, but 
are fine eating when well cooked. 

The Chinese have the best faculty of preparing "small deer" for 
the table. Lord Macartney when in China, was peculiarly grati- 
fied with the taste of a ragout at dinner: turning to the attendant 
with an enquiring look, he said Quack, Quack : the waiter shook his| 
head and exclaimed Bow wow. Upon receiving this intelligence 
his dinner came up quicker than it went down. 

The Negroes of the West India Islands are very fond of cat's 
meat. A late traveller in Jamaica seeing a negro in the stocks, ask- 
ed what meritorious action had entitled him to that situation : he 

was told it was for killing 
and eating a large white 
cat. After supper the 
overseer acquainted the 
white people that Black 
Tom had killed the white 
cat some time throughout 
the night, when it was hisj 
spell to keep watch in the, 
yard, and had aflerwardsl 
eaten it. "The skin has 
A MUSHROOXVT. 





" I've supped full of horrors !" [Shakspeare.] 

(See Comic Token.) 



been found in his house, along with the skins of several others, from 
which it appears he has been the scoundrel who has destroyed the 
cats, which accounts for their going a missing for some time back, 
till now. With the exception of the black one, we have none in the 
house : the consequence of which is, we are like to be eaten out 
with rats and mice. This must be put a stop to, and Tom's appe- 
tite taught to relish other food upon the plantation. And it has not 
been out of any favor to us that he has spared the black one ; it was 
out of prejudice to the color : for I never 
yet knew of an instance where a black 
cat fell a prey to the negro's desire of 
cat's meat." Next morning the delin- 
quent was brought out and the overseer 
proceeded to the administration of jus- 
tice. As he was aware that the negroea 
don't like "speakee and floggee too," he 

TOM PAIN. 





CAT O' NINE TAILS. 



without any waste of words or- 
dered Tom to be laid down 
and to receive thirty-nine lashes 
iwell laid on. This was prompt- 
ly done with a 



" Any ting pite you dare ?'* inquired one Dutchman of ano- 
ther, engaged in angling ; " No, notting at all." " Veil," re- 
turned the other, " notting pite me too." 

A painter being employed to represent some cherubim and 
seraphim in a church, he made them appear with very sorrow- 
ful crying faces. His reverend employer asking him his reason 

■ for doing so, he replied, that his prayer-book informed him that 

\" cherubim and seraphim continually do cry" 

A woman offering to sign a deed, the judge asked her wheth- 
er her husband compelled her to sign. " He compel me !" 
said the lady, " no, nor twenty like him." 



A gentleman sent for his tailor, an Irishman, and told him he had 
made his coat and waistcoat so small, that he could not wear them 
and ordered him to take them home and let them out Pat promised 
he would ; and he certainly did, in a most extraordinary manner. 
Some time afterwards , the gentleman surprised at the man's de- 
lay, sent for him, and 
when he came, asked 
what had become of 
his coat and waist 
coat "Och, by my 
sowl!" says Paddy, 
" I have let them out, 
as yer honor wished 5 
and the divil burn me 
but I think I have 
made a very good 
bargin ; for they hap- 
pened to fit a coun- 
thrymanof mine, and 
I have let them out to 
him, at a shilling aj 
week ; and he has en-| 
gaged to wear themj 
at That price, for three 
months certain, whe- 
ther he lives or dies." 

FITTED TO A T. 






8th Month. AUGUST hath 31 days. 1835. 




When noon is in the flaming sky, 




Seek me some shadowy, silent wood ; 




Recline upon a mossy knoll, 




Cast care aside, and yield the soul 




To that luxurious quietude. 




ASTRONOMICAL CALCUL ATIONS. 




fc 


Dys. d. m. Dys. d. m. Dys. d. m. Dys. o. m. Dys. d. m. 




1 


18 10 7 116 351 13 


14 501 19 


12 57! 25 I 10 57 




£ 


2 


17 55 


8 


16 18 


14 


14 32 


20 


12 38 


26 


10 36 




CD 


3 


17 39 


9 


16 1 


15 


14 14 


21 


12 18 


27 


10 15 




Q 


4 


17 24 


10 


15 44 


16 


13 55 


22 


11 58 


28 


9 54 




ao 


5 


17 8 


11 


15 6 


17 


13 36 


23 


11 38 


29 


9 33 




6l 6 


16 51 


12 


15 8 


18 


13 17 


24 


11 17 


30 


9 11 




MOON'S PHASES. 




D. H. M. D. H. M. 




]) First Quarter, 1 3 6a. 1 ©New Moon 23 11 38a. 




OFullMoon, 8 10 55m. | ]) First Quarter, 30 8 9a. 1 




a Last Quarter, 16 4 31m. | | 







J? Sun 


rSun S. 


Moon Moon 


High 


Holydays, Aspects, 




k 


S 


Rises, Sets 


M. S. 


South. 


R. S 


Water 


Wind, Weather, &c. 




1 


Sa. 


4 52 


7 20 


6 3 


5 56 


11 12 


4 : 


x. w. Biting Frost. 




2 


Su. 


4 53 


7 19 


5 59 


6 49 


11 43 


4 5£ 


Is. w. Low Tides 




3 


M. 


4 54 


7 18 


5 55 


7 46 


Morn. 


5 56 


s. 5 in Perigee 




4 


Tu. 


4 55 


7 16 


5 50 


8 46 


23 


7 IS 


>s. e. Hot. 




5 


W. 


4 56 


7 15 


5 45 


9 48 


1 12 


8 45 


s. Greatest elong. £ 




6 


Th. 


4 57 


7 14 


5 39 


10 48 


2 11 


9 5? 


s. w. Cooler with 




7 


F. 


4 58 


7 13 


5 33 


11 46 


rises 


10 54 


s, smoke. 




8 


Sa. 


4 59 


7 11 


5 25 


o 3 


7 47 


11 45 


e. Tides rather high 




9 


Su. 


5 


7 10 


5 18 


41 


8 18 


Morn. 


E.S. E. & J) $: i 




10 


M. 


5 1 


7 9 


5 9 


1 31 


8 44 


27 


w. Girls grow love- 1 




11 


Tu. 


5 2 


7 8 


5 1 


2 17 


9 7 


1 9 


s. w. sick. Warmer. I 




12 


W. 


5 3 


7 7 


4 51 


3 


9 2S 


1 44 


s.LouisXVI.deth.'92 




13 


Th. 


5 4 


7 5 


4 41 


3 42 


9 50 


2 19 


s. w. Stormy. 




14 


F. 


5 5 


7 4 


4 31 


4 24 


10 13 


2 51 


e. Buon. born '69. 




15 


Sa. 


5 6 


7 2 


4 20 


5 6 


10 38 


3 25 


»r. e. Fiery CooZ. 




10 


Su., 


5 7 


7 1 


4 8 


5 49 


11 6 


4 


n.w. j) in Apogee 




17 


M. 


5 8 


6 59 


3 56 


6 35 


11 38 


4 37 


s. w. Very low tides 




18 


Tu. 


5 9 


6 58 


3 44 


7 23 


Morn. 


5 31 


* (5 $ ? 




19 


W., 


5 10 


6 56 


3 31 


8 13 


17 


6 48 


N. E. ($ D # 




20 


Th. 


5 11 


6 55 


3 17 


9 6 


1 6 


8 12 


s. e. Snowy. 




21 


F. 


3 12 


6 54 


3 3 


10 


2 7 


9 25 


b. w. Wm, IV. b. '65. 




22 


Sa. 


5 14 


6 52 


2 49 


10 53 


3 23 


10 18 


n. w. £ # © <$ 9 j 




23 


Su. 


5 15 


6 51 


2 34 


11 45 


sets. 


11 3 


s. e. Stormy. 




24 


M. 


5 16 


6 49 


2 19 


36 


7 31 


11 47 


g. e. High Tides. 




25 


Tu. 


5 17 


6 48 


2 3 


1 26 


7 57 


25 


n. e. Fery #o/. 




2G 


W. 


5 18 


6 46 


1 47 


2 14 


8 22 


1 3 


N. W. £ D <? 




27 


Th. 


5 19 


6 44 


1 30 


3 3 


8 47 


1 41 


s. w. <5 D ^ 




28 


F. 


5 20 


6 42 


1 13 


3 53 


9 14 


2 18 


s. 3) in Perigee 




29 


Sa. 


5 21 


6 41 


56 


4 45 


9 46 


2 54 


e. Bat. R. I. '78. 




30 


3u. 


5 22 


6 39 


38 


5 41 


10 22 


3 36 


s. w. A Q 4*Regulus 




31 


M. 


5 23 6 37 


20 


6 39 


11 6 


4 SOs.TideslowSup.^ £ | 




OVER THE WAY. 



Alas ! the flames of an unhappy lover, 
About ray heart and on my vitals prey ; 
I've caught a fever that 1 can't get over, 

Over the way ! 
Oh ! why are eyes of hazel ? noses Grecian ? 
I've lost my rest by night, my peace by day, 
For want of some brown Holland or Venetian, 

Over the way ! 

[Concluded in the Comic Token.] 
Bless me 1 ! I My dress- is never so short as that surely I ! ! 




F.W 



•fIXdady alarmed at her own Shadow. 




29 
HAY MAKING. 

When grass is very 
thin, and not full of sap, 
it may be cut in the 
forenoon and raked in 
the afternoon of the 
same day ; and then dry 
sufficiently in cocks in 
two or three days. But 
if a heavy rain falls, it 
will need to be opened 
and exposed to the sun 
for a few hours. If 
there he only a small 
quantity of rain, it may 
be sufficient to pull out 
some of the hay round 
the bottoms, or only on 
that side which was 
windward when the 
rain fell, and lay it on 
the tops. If the cocks 
are so situated that the 
SEEY DEY 1 water has run much 
under their bottoms, they should be turned bottom upwards and 
trimmed. Farmers in this climate generally wish for but little rain 
in April, and for much in May and June ; then less in hay-time and 
English harvest. But as it is not left to us to order this matter, we 
should endeavor to accommodate ourselves to the seasons, and to 
assist nature whenever we have an opportunity for doing it. Where 
a second crop is expected the same year, thick grass should be cut 
early. 



A STRETCHER. An elderly gentleman of unimpeached veracity, relates 
the following. During the early days of this town, before carts oaine in vogue,. 
he was accustomed to haul his wood by the aid of an old black mare, kept in his 
service. Now the old mare's harness consisted of a breast-plate and traces, made 
of the untanned hide of an ox. At the close of a rainy day he went to his wood- 
lot, situated some forty or fifty rods from his dwelling, for the purpose of procur- 
ing a load of wood. After cutting' a log which he judged a smart load for his 
beast, he fastened her to one end, set her head towards home, and gave her ihe 
rein. The old mare continued her course till she arrived at his door, when u 

his surprise, he discovered that ow 
ingto the great extensibility of the 
traces, they had stretched the whole 
distance without breaking, or mov 
ing the load an inch. Throwing 
down his axe he went to his beast 
and removing the harness from hei 
threw the breasi-plate over a post 
that stood near the door, and weni 
to bed. Upon rising the next morn- 
ing, he found the heat of the morn- 
ing sun had so operated on the 
coniractibility of the traces, as to 
bring his wood up to the d^or, read; 
for hewing and splitting. 




SOJY and shade. 



3* 




FLY TIME. 

Flies and Musquitoes 
are very troublesome to 
horses and horned cattle, 
during the months oi July 
and August. They annoy 
the cattle terribly near the 
banks of some of the large 
western rivers, where the 
-musquitoes are so thick 
that fires are built in the 
A*Backbhe^ fields for the horses to 

stand near ; and their sagacity is so great that they go up to the 
houses and neigh for the inhabitants to replenish the fire. They! 
stand so near as frequently to burn the hair and flesh off their 
egs. Weld, the historian, tells us that " these insects were so| 
powerful and blood-thirsty, that they actually pierced through 
General Washington's boots." In Italy, near the Po, great 
numbers of very large ones are to be seen, terrible for biting, 
and venomous, piercing through a thrice doubled stocking, and 
boots likewise. A Cape-Cod-man bet that he would lie down 
naked on the salt meadows a quarter of an hour, and submit to 
the utmost fury of the musquitoes for that term, without once 
wincing. Accordingly the wager was staked ; he lay down in 
one of the calm hot evenings of August, on the side of a marsh 
where they were flying about by millions. He lay sometime in 
this situation without shrinking, and put the whole flock of fiends 
at defiance. One of the company fearing at last the fellow 
would win the wager, stepped aside, and put the small end of 
his cane in the fire, with which he returned, and slily applied it 
[to his naked back. He could hold out no longer, but shrunk 
from the touch with violence, taking it for the bite of a large fly. 

" You have lost the wa- 
ger." I have lost it, sure 
enough, said he. But if 
it had not been for that 
^^^^^^^^§^ M?!il^^ d — d ganniniper, I should, 
^7^^^ ^^ ^^^^ tB^ 1 ^^ nave won ft- (A Ganni- 
nu .<■ -r . i „>^ nipper is a large green fly| 

abounding in pine woods, 
of a very keen stiflg, pe- 
culiarly painful and ven- 

" Fly not yet." OmoUS.) 





[Shakspeare.] 



I never in the whole course of my life saw such a quiet, easy, 
comfortable creature as aunt Bridget. She was immensely fat, 
because she was — all fat. I don't think there was an ounce 01 
lean in her whole composition. She was so impurturbably good 
natured, that I really do not believe fshe was ever in a passion 
in her life. I have no doubt she had her troubles ; we all have 
troubles. Her greatest trouble was going up stairs to bed : and 
it was a trouble for her to come down stairs to breakfast. — 
Knowing her aversion to moving I was saucy enough to recom- 
mend her to make two days into one, that she might not have 
the trouble of going up and down stairs so often. Whilst en 
; oying this comfortable state, she was fated to endure the pangs 
inflicted by the dart of love. A gay old bachelor made advan- 
ces, and was accepted. In an evil hour he invited her to join 
the mazy dance and trip it on her " light /Mastic toe." Her 
aeices had laced her stays so tight, that in the first dance she 
burst her lacing. This accident set the whole company in a 
roar, and herself in such a passion that she weighed ten pounds 
less the next morning. 



32 



MUSICAL. 



" I always sing to please 
myself," said a gentleman who 
was humming a tune in 
company. — " Then you're not 
at all difficult to please," said a 
lady who sat next him. 

Old Astley, one evening, when 
his band were playing an over- 
ture, went to the horn-players, 
and asked why they were not 
playing. They said they had 
twenty bars' rest. Rest ! says 
he ; I'll have nobody rest in my 
company : I pay you for playing 
— not for resting. 




The first time the musical 
instrument called the Serpent 
was used at a concert at which 
Handel presided, he was so 
much surprised with the coarse- 
ness of its tones, that he called 

out hastily, " Vat de devil is MUSIC— An "Accidental Sharp." 
dat ?" On being informed it was the Serpent, he replied, " It never 
can be de serpent vat seduced Eve!" 



Foote being once annoyed by a poor fiddler's 'straining harsh dis- 
cord ' under his window, sent him out a shilling, with a request that 
he would play elsewhere, as one scraper at the door was sufficient 

THE WISE CHILD. 

How plain your little darling says " mamma ;" 
But still she calls you " doctor," not " papa." 

One thing is clear : your conscientious rib 
Has not yet taught the pretty dear to fib. 

jf Quaker's Description 
of Pagamni. He ha* a 
curious skill in drawing 
the tail of a horse over the 
bowels of a cat, and mak- 
ing a sound which people 
call music. 

"I shall soon die,Cuffv 
—I must set out upon a 
long journey," said a sick 
man to his old negro serv- 
ant. "Berrv well," repli- 
ed Cuffy,'! guess mann 
hab good going, cause t> 
be all way down hill." 

Guessing. "Jack, whicli 
is the way to E|>ping ."' 
"How do yo« know my 
narae is Jack?" "I gue> 
it." ••Then guesa you 

THE HAIRS IN LODOISKA. way toEppmg." 





FAST DAY. 

" Oh ! husband, you're the worst of sinners, 
Who dare to eat that wicked meat, 
And on a fast day make such dinners." 
Thus spake a wife, a bigot strict, 
Who penance hard and no reward 
Upon her husband would inflict. 
"Well now," said he, "to work I'll go, 
While you can stay at home and pray; 
And you can fast for me you know. 
"Why," she replied, "while you're away, 
I'll just go down towards the town, 
And with some pious neighbor stay. 
Said he, "Our children dress require, 
I've bought new clothes t so work at those. 
And make them fast — that I desire. 
" All in the house for three weeks past, 
On a poor dish of wretched fish, 
Have for your pleasure been madejnst. 
But this is right—and you shall see, 
To aid your plan much as I can, 
The doers shall be made fast by me!" 



9th Month. 



SEPTEMBER hath 30 days. 



1835 



The maid afield now leaves the farm. 
With dinner basket on her arm, 

Loitering unseen in narrow lane, 
To be o'ertook by following 1 swain. 



ASTRONOMICAL CALCULATIONS. 



:|Dys. d. m. Dys. d. m. Dys. d. m. Dys. d. m. Dys. p. m. 



I 8 28| 

8 6 

7 44 

7 22 

7 

6 38 



7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 



I 6 161 13 



5 53 

5 20 

5 8 

4 45 

4 22 



14 
15 

1C 
17 

18 



59i 19 I 1 401 25 
1 



20 
21 
22 
23 
24 



17 

54 
30 
7 
S 17 



26 
27 

23 
29 
30 



40f 
4 

27 
50 



2 14 
2 37 



XSOON'S PHASES. 

D. H. 

Full Moon, 6 10 
Last Quarter, 14 11 



M. 

7a. I % New Moon, 
0a. | J> First Quarter, 



D. H. M. 

22 11 42m 

29 2 44m 



Tu. 

W. 
3Th. 
4E. 



Sa. 
Su. 
M. 
Tu. 
W. 
10 Th. 



161 



19 



21 



23 



27 



5 24 



Sun SunF Moon Moon High . Holydays, Aspects, 
Rises, Sets. m. s. South. R. S. Water. Wind, Weather, &c. 



5 266 



14 M. 
15Tu 



W. 



17 Th 

18 F. 



Sa. 



20 Su 



M. 



22 Tu. 



W. 



24 Th. 
25 
26 Sa. 



Su. 



28 M. 

29 Tu. 
SOW. 



27 



286 
296 
306 
316 
326 
336 
346 
356 
366 
376 
386 
396 
406 
416 
426 
436 
446 
456 
466 
475 
485 
495 
505 
515 
535 
545 
555 



360 
350 18 
330 36 

55 

1 15 
1 35 

1 55 

2 15 
2 36 

2 56 

3 17 
3 38 



31 
30 

28 
26 
25 
23 
21 
19 
17 



163 59 
144 20 

1214 41 

115 2 

95 23 

75 44 

56 5 

46 26 

26 47 

07 8 

587 29 

567 49 

548 10 

528 30 

508 50 

499 11 

47© 30 

4 9 50 



7 39 

8 39 

9 37 

10 31 

11 22 

8 

10 

54 

1 36 

2 18 

3 

3 43 

4 27 

5 14 

6 4 

6 55 

7 48 

8 41 

9 33 

10 25 

11 15 
5 

55 

1 46 

2 39 

3 35 

4 33 

5 33 

6 34 

7 32 



Morn. 

1 

1 4 

2 13 
rises. 

6 46 

7 9 
7 30 

7 51 

8 13 

8 36 
9 

9 34 
10 11 

10 56 

11 48 
Morn. 

48 

1 55 

3 7 
sets 
6 23 

6 48 

7 15 

7 45 

8 21 

9 4 
9 54 

10 55 
Morn. 



5 41 

7 11 

8 45 

9 53 



n. w. Low tides. 
s. e. Lond. bt 1666. 
s. s. e. Muggy 
n. w. weather. 



10 48s. 6 5 tfDogd'ysend. 

11 32 s. w. Lafayette bn. '57. 
Morn. n. Tides quite high. 

13n. e. White squall. 

44 s. w. Bat. L. Erie '13. 

1 15 w. Bat Brandy'e'77 
1 44 n. w. Children 



2 12 s. 
2 41 s. e. 



3 13 s. Very low tides. 



3 55 

4 46 



troublesome. 
5 in Apogee. 



7 31 

8 51 

9 51 s. s. w. 



N . w. Pleasant. 

6J>21 
0k w. St Lambert 
T«ry 
warm. 

10 43 w. e. St. Matthew. 

11 25*. w. ($5 9 
1 s. w. Very high Tides. 

37N.Autumnbeg. ^ Dh\ 

1 13 s.j) in Perigee. 

1 50 re. e. Cloudy 

2 31 n. n. e. Mornings, 

3 18s. w. £ ?vn 

4 1 1 n. w. St. Michael. 

5 32s.e. Low Tides. 



10th Month. 



OCTOBER hath 31 days. 



1835. 



Arise, thou child of nature, rise ! 

Arouse thy slumbering spirit now ! 
The Autumn sheaves are on the hill, 
And solemn are the woods and still, 

With clustering 1 fruits on every bough. 



ASTRONOMICAL CALCULATIONS. 



K Dys. p. m. Dye, p. m. Dys. p. m. Dys. p. m. Dys. p. m. 



D 



o 

24 

47 
10 
34 

57 



7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 



5 


20 


13 1 


5 


43 


14 


6 


G 


15 


6 


28 


16 


6 


51 


17 


7 


14 


18 



8 21 
8 44 



19 I 9 501 25 111 58 



20 
21 
22 
23 
24 



10 11 


26 


10 33 


27 


10 54 


28 


11 16 


29 


11 37 


30 



12 18 

12 39 

12 59 

13 19 
13 39 



O Full Moon, 
d Last Quarter, 



MOON S PHASES. 

P. H. M. P. H. M. 

6 16a. I # New Moon, 21 7 23a. 

14 5 8a. J D First Quarter, 28 11 2m. 



F. Moon Moon, High 
s. South. R. S. Water. 



Holydays, Aspects, 
Wind, Weather, <fcc. 



K 3 



1 10 

S 13 
14 



Sun Sun 
Rises, Sets. m. 



Th 

F. 

Sa 

Su. 

M. 

6Tu 

W. 

8Th 

9F. 



Tu. 
W. 

15 Th. 

16 F. 

17 Sa. 

18 Su. 
19M. 
|20 Tu. 

W. 



Sa. 

Su. 

2M. 



23 
24 
25 



26 M. 



27 
28 



565 
575 

585 
595 



6 105 
6 11 



6 



21 

22 Th 
F. 
Sa. 
Su. 



Tu 
W. 



29Th 



30 
81 



F. 
Sa. 



25 
35 
45 
55 

65 

85 
95 



125 
135 



6 145 

15 

17 

18 

19 
6 2116 
6 22 
6 235 
6 24 
6 25 
6 275 
6 285 
6 295 
6 314 
6 324 



43 
42 

40 
39 
38 
36 
34 
33 
31 
29 
28 
26 
24 
22 
20 
19 
17 
16 
14 
13 
11 



10 
10 
10 

11 
11 
11 

11 

12 
12 
12 
13 
13 
13 
13 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
15 



15 
1015 
15 



9 
28 
47 

6 
24 
42 
59 
16 
33 
49 

5 
20 
34 
49 

2 
15 
28 
39 
51 

1 
11 
21 
29 
37 
44 
51 
57 



8 27 

9 18 
10 6 

10 50 

11 33 Rises 



S 

14 
56 



1 39 

2 22 

3 8 

3 57 

4 47 

5 38 

6 30 

7 22 

8 13 

9 3 
9 52 

10 41 

11 32 

25 

1 22 

2 21 

3 23 

4 26 

5 27 

6 24 



5 56 

6 17 

6 40 

7 5 

7 33 

8 7 

8 48 

9 36 

10 32 

11 36 
Morn 

45 

1 56 

3 8 

4 22 
sets. 

5 42 

6 15 

6 56 

7 47 

8 46 

9 53 
11 4 



6 7 16Morn 



8 4 
8 50 



14 

1 22 



3 7 8n. e. Low tides. 

1 13 8 37s.w. £ 3> 9 

2 23 9 45 s. Showery. 

3 3110 35n. Sup. £ J© 
11 17n. w. Fine weathe 
11 51 s. for Grain. 
Morn. n. Tides rather high. 

18n.w. □#© 

44 s. A Harrycane. 

1 93. J) in Apogee. 

1 36 if. America dis. 1492. 

2 6w. w. Muddy. 

2 40 a. 6?>% 

3 24 s. Tides very low. 

4 1 1 if. g Greatest elong. 

5 21 ir. e. <$ ? \ 

6 48 s. x. A blue sky. 

8 15 n. i. St. Luke. 

9 20s. b.e. & \Q 
10 8n. w. Chain lightning. 
10 53 e. Nuts ripen 



1 1 30 Tides extremely high 
lOs.DinPerigce.^ D $ 

47|k.w. St. Crispin 

1 31 



s. Macedonian cap. '12 
leaves 
fall off. 
s. e. St. Judas. 
n. Tid«s quite low. 
6 3> 9 



2 16 n. 

3 6w.it. E. 

4 5 

5 17 

6 50 
8 16)w. 4 $ # 



36 



BOTHERATION ! ! ! 

Och ! look at the disthressed Mother! 
Poh ! the Hen ar'nt the Mother, you goos*. 
Well, then she's the Parent any how. 




The old wife's plan of suffering a hen to hatch a chicken or two 
with the ducklings, is unwise. The hen for the sake of even a sin 
gle individual of her natural progeny, will entirely neglect tf}* 
ducklings, at the critical time when they most need her guidance 
and protection. Their aquatic nature will be constantly urging 
them to the water, where they will remain until exhausted, return- 
ing to land like drowning rats, and probably finding no mother to 
brood them. Thus great numbers of ducklings are lost for a chick 
en or two. Old women have a notion that the variety of ducks 
which have the bill bending upward s,lay a greater number of eggs 

than common. But with ducks 
well fed you will never fail 
of having plenty of eggs. 




Hatched and Hc\f Hatched. 



i 

I can imagine anyone lying abed in the I 37*1 

winter ; but my dear Tom ! what the deuce Why, my good fellow, the' 

can induce you to lie abed in the "Glorious . arc SQ dreadfully j 
Summer time ? I J 




EARLY RISING— TOO MUCH TIME. 





COUNTRY NURSING. 



CITY NURSING. 



I 




WATER JVAG-TAiuo. 



11th Month. 



NOVEMBER hath 30 days. 



1835. 



There's not a flower upon the hill, 

There's not a leaf upon the tree ; 
The summer-bird hath left its bough, 
Bright child of sunshine, singing now 
In spicy lands beyond the sea. 



ASTRONOMICAL CAXCTXIiATXOCTS. 



hi 



© 



Dys. p. m. Dys. d. m. Dys. p. m. Dys. n. m. Dys. 



I 14 191 7 U6 101 13 117 521 19 U9 231 25 

2 

3 

4 



14 33 


8 


16 2S 


14 


18 8 


20 


19 37 


26 


14 57 


9 


1G 45 


15 


18 2* 


21 


19 51 


27 


15 15 


10 


17 2 


16 


18 3D 


22 


20 4 


28 


15 34 


11 


17 19 


17 


18 54 


23 


20 17 


29 


15 52 


12 


17 30 


18 


19 9 


24 


20 29 


30 



120 41 

20 53 

21 2 

91 36j 



SXOOZT'S PHASES. 



E». H. M. 

O Full Moon, 5 5 31m. 
A Last Quarter, 13 9 44m. 



Q New Moon, 
P First Quarter, 



20 

26 



H. M. 

5 46m 
11 2a 



lSu. 

2,M. 

3 ( Tu. 

4W. 

o'Th. 

6F. 

7Sa. 

8Su. 

9M. 
lOTu. 
11 W. 
13Tb. 

13 F. 

14 Sa. 
15JSU. 
16M. 
17 Tu. 

isKv. 

19Th. 

20 F. 

21 Sa. 
22Su. 

23 M. 

24 Tu. 

25 W 

26 Th. 
»7F. 

28 Sa. 

29 Su. 
OiM. 



Sun 
Rises, Sets 



6 334 
6 34,4 
6 334 
6 364 
6 38|4 
6 394 
6 40,4 
6 42(4 
6 434 
6 444 
6 464 
6 47J4 
6 484 
6 504 



an F. Moon 
South 



5516 
54,16 
53,16 
51116 
5016 
4916 
4816 



6 514 
6 524 
6 534 
6 544 
6 554 
6 57U 
6 584 
6 594 
04 
24 
34 



44 
54 

64 
84 
914 



16 
16 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 

39:15 

3815 
3714 
3614 
3514 
3514 
3414 
3313 
3213 
3213 
3112 
3012 
3012 
2911 
2911 
29111 



15 
16 
17 

17 
16 
14 
11 

7 

3 
5* 
51 
44 
37 
38 
18 

S 
56 
44 
31 
17 

3 
47 
31 
14 
56 
38 
18 
58 
38 
16 



Moon 1 High 1 Holydays, Aspects, . 
S. Water. Wind, Weather, &o 



10 13 
10 54 



9 32 2 29 9 21 



11 36itises. 



S 
19 
4 
52 
41 
32 
23, 



3 33 

4 35 



6 6 

6 45 

7 30 

8 23 

9 23 
14J10 27 

411 35 



10 9 

10 44 

11 14 
11 43 



e. Low Tides.- 
e. Trees lore. 

e. w. 4 9 y 

w. White frost. 

s. Powder Plot, 1605. 



5 8 

5 34,Mora. p-.E. Tides quite high.! 

11 s. j in Apogee. Trans-} 

39 



6 52,Morn. 



40 

28 



9 17 
10 8 



45 

1 57 

3 11 

4 26| 
Sets. 

4 45 

5 32 

6 30 

7 37 

8 49 
10J10 2 

111 13 

6 48Mcrn. 

7 31 31 

8 13 1 26 
8 53! 3 38 



1 
1 
2 
3 
3 
4 

6 17 

7 30 

8 37 

9 26 

10 14 

11 
11 46 

32 



it. of £ visible. 

10 k. Montreal taken '75j 

43 s. s. e. 4 3) 2f 

18 s. s. w. St. Martin 
2 w. Low Tides. 

49 e. <j 9 $ 

52 s. Great Gale. 

s. w. Ld.Chat. b.'80. 
s.e. J.Furguson d.'76. 
.x. e. Thick fog. 
w.w. ,i J) \i & £ 
s. ©ec. in vis. Q © 9 
if. J) in Perigee. 
s. High Tides: <$ 3> 9 
s.w. Charming 

w.s.w. mornings. 



20 

8 
59 
56 



7 24 

8 32 



1 

2 

2 

3 

4 59;e.s.e. 

6 13n.w. Low Tides. 

n. e. Advent Sunday. 

w. St. Andrew. 



s. Great elong. £ 
w. N.Y.evacuated'f! 

E.N.W. 4 J) p 

.1 Cooler. 



12th Month. 



DECEMBER hath 31 days. 



1835. 



Around the glowing' hearth at night, 
The harmless laugh and winter tale 

Go round, while parting friends delight 
To toast each other o'er their ale. 



ASTRONOMICAL CALCULATIONS. 



w 



© 



Dys. d. m. Dys. 



122 Tz 
22 42 
22 48 
28 54 

22 59 

23 4 



Dys. 



D. M. 


Dys. 


D. M. 


123 ® !:• '23 -:•• 


23 13 


20 


23 27 


23 16 


21 


23 27 


23 19 


22 


23 28 


23 22 


23 


23 27 


23 24 


24 


23 27 



Dys. 



21 461 7 1 


21 55 


8 


22 4 


9 


22 12 


10 


22 20 


11 


22 28 


12 



13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 



25 
26 

27 
28 
29 
30 



23 26 

23 24 

23 22 

23 19 

23 16 

23 13 



MOON'S PHASES. 

D. Hi. M. D. H. M. 

O Full Moon, 5 52m. I £ New Moon, 19 4 30a. 

d Last Quarter, 13 2m. | J) First Quarter, 26 2 50a. 



High Holyoays, Aspects, 
Water. Wind, Weather, &c. 



Til- 

w. 

Th, 
F. 

Sa. 
£11. 
M. 

8|Tu 



W. 
lOThJ 



11 



12Sa.7 



13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 



Sun jSun F, 
Rises, Sets. 



F. 



Su. 
M. 

Tu. 
W. 

Th. 

F. 

Sa. 

Su. 

M. 

Tu, 

W. 

Th, 

F. 

Sa. 

Su. 

M. 

Tu 

W. 

Th. 



7 104 29 
i 114 29 
7 124 28 
7 134 28 
7 144 28 
7 154 28 
7 164 28 8 
7 174 28 8 
7 184 28 
7 194 28 
7 204 28 
214 28 
7 2ll4 28 

!r 22(4 28 

7 23|4 28 
7 24J4 28 
,7 244 29 
7 25|4 29 
7 254 29 
7 264 30 
9 264 30 
.i 274 31 
7 274 31 
.7 284 32 
7 284 32 
7 294 33 
7 294 34 
7 294 31 
.7 294 35 
7 304 36 
7 30 4 37 



54 
32 

8 
45 
2Q 
55^ 
30 

4 
37 
10 
43 
15 
47 
18 
49 
20 
50 
21 
51 
21 
51 
21 
51 
21 

9 
39 

9 
39 

§ 
37 

6 



Moon 
South 



Moon 
R. S. 



9 34 

10 17 

11 1 

11 48 Rises. 



37 

1 28 

2 19 

3 10 


47 
34 



3 29 

4 31 

5 3310 41 



11 13 
Till 47 

43 Morn. 
20 
54 



5 26 

6 18 

7 



4 
4 
5 
6 
7 

7 55 

8 46, 

9 41 

10 41 

11 45 

51 

1 56 

2 57 

3 52 

4 41 

5 27 



16 

8 18 

9 24 
10 31 

2011 39 
7 Morn. 
49 
2 
3 
4 
5 



2 
17 
36 

58 



Sets. 

5 12 

6 26 

7 41 

8 55 
10 6 



9 25 
10 Sir. e. 



27 
5 
45 
38 
32 
32 
37 
48 

8 47 

9 43 

10 40 

11 33 
2': 



Cloudy. 

Buo. cr. 1804 
e. Revo.inEng.1688 
n. w. 5 in Apogee. 
n. Tides rather high 
s. Hail storm. 

n.w. £J)2l 
s. w. Girls rather 

s, waspish, 

n. Gloomy 

n. e. weather. 

s. w. Gay d. '82. 
, Very low tides. 
s. s. w. "Wash, d. '99. 



6 1011 13 
6 52,Morn. 



7 33 

8 15 

8 58 

9 44 



1 22 

2 24 

3 25 



11 

59 
47 
35 
26 

18 



IS 6 17 



s. Clear with 

s. w. & J) h Bust. 
n. w. Women very 
n. e. Cross. 

J) in 'Perigee 
Very h. tides. <$ $ © 
n. St.Thomas. <$ J) 9 
e. s. e. Winter begins, 

S. E. i^O&g-?/. 

n.e. Christmas Day. 
n.w. St. Stephen. 
s. w. Low tides, 
w. Cap. of JavaJ2 
s. w. SnowS 

Buffalo 

. J> in Apoge 




TOPS 



AISTD BOTTOS&S. 



A young lady while 
walking with a gentle- 
man, stumbled : and 
when her companion to 
prevent her fall grasp- 
ed her hand somewhat 
tightly, " Oh, sir," she 
simpered, "If it comes 
to that you must ask 
papa. 

An Apothecary who 
prided himself on his 
knowledge of drugs, as- 
serted in company that 
all bitter things were 
hot. "No," said a gen- 
tleman present, "there 
is one of a very differ- 
ent quality — a bitter 
cold day. 




41 




Fancy Portrait. — Captain Rock. 

"I thought you told me that Smith's 
fever had gone off," said a gentle- 
man. "I did so," said his compan- 
ion, " but forgot to mention that he 
went off along with it." 

" Well, my good boy, have you 
gF- been confirmed ?" asked a pious old 
^J^fe^lady of'a hopeful youth. " No marm. 
' ^Sr.^but I've been waccinated." u I 

} -your father a Catholic?" " N< 

Old Head on Y&ung Shoulders. | rnarm, he's a shoemaker" 

Home Tooke was interrogated before the commissioners of the 
income tax, he said he lived on his ivits, but advised them by no 
means to follow his example ! " 



You have not yet arrived 
at the age of discretion. 



Can you 
tell me 
my age 
Doctor ? 




An undertaker was observ- 
ed to shed tears at the inter- 
ment of a quack. A friend 
asked him the cause of it. 
"Why," said he, " you see 
I have just buried one of my 
best friends." 

Where's the advantage? An- _ 
old proser one day meeting a smart^^^^^^ 
looking stranger accosted him very^fP^=|p=L_ . 
familiarly thus : " Ah ! how do you do — how have you been— how is your family," etc* etc. 
The man, looking at the interrogator with some credulity, at length answered, <e Very 
I well, sir, thank you j but you've got the advantage of me." "Got the advantage of you ! 

■ How, sir." 4 * Why, I don't know you." ct Well, I don't know you! Where's the 

■ .advantage ?" 




A CURE FOR SCOLDING 
WIVES. 

Wedlock 's a glorious thing, 
Blessings be on the end on't; 
Should your neck break with 

string, 
Sweet is at least the spinning on't 

UNDER THIS THJMB 

The most valuable discovery of the present daj is, the mak- 
ing; of Laughing Gas, for the cure of scolding women. Let a 
woman wake in the morning with a disposition like a " cross-cut 
saw," and who will box your ears till they sing like a tea-kettle, 
or attempt to " break your head" with r. poker, by forcing a 
little of this gas down her throat she will have a disposition like 
a turtle-dove all day. Many a poor hen-peck'd fellow who is 
kept "under the thumb" of his better half, is not aware of this 
invaluable remedy. We shall give a recipe for making it in 
the Comic Token. The only danger to be appreh Vd, is in 
the mode of giving it. In the engraving opposite, trie iady who 
sits laughing in the chair, has received her morning dose, while 
the other lady is receiving her's. That there is danger in giv- 
ing the gas will be seen by the illustration below, which repre- 
sents two gentlemen in not a " very enviable" situation. They 
have got overcome themselves in attempting to overcome their 
wives with the gas. 





TROTTER BROTH. 

Take pigs feet, scald and clean them well, then put them into a frving-pa 
with a ladleftilof broih, a little salt and a piece of butter ; fry them a while, then 
put in a lUtle parsley and spearmint, and some fine pepper ; when they are fryed 
almost enough, make a sauce for them of mutton gravy, the yolks of 3 or 4 eggs, 
the juice of a lemon and a little nutmeg ; put this into "the frying-pan to the trot- 
ters, give them a toss or two, dish them and serve them up. 



Well ! 1 know you be ! | Sair, I am at Wkert ? 




A short time gretting an answer. 



A short time since in New-Jersey, 
happy P a ' r w © re joined in wedlock by 
facetious squire, whose fees totally ex-' 
hausted the funds of the bridegroom. Not 
many days it appears had elapsed, before 
the parties who had been joined till death 
should part them, became mutually dis- 
satisfied with their lot, and returned to 
the squire with their many tales of wo,' 
beseeching him with their eloquence to 
unmarry them ; which he agreed to do, 
provided he was previously paid the sum 
of 3 dollars— double the fee of the first 
ceremony. This sum the bridegroom paid 
by a week's labor on the squire's farm. 
Then came the ceremony of parting ! The 
squire placed a block on the floor, on which 
was put a live cat ; one pulled the head 
and the other the tail, while the squire, 
with an axe severed the cat in twain, a^ 
the same timeexclaiming "Death has part- 
ed you." The couple departed with a 
firm belief that the performance was 
strictly legal, and have not lived together 
since. 



I ■■ 




Van Dieman's Land is an island separated from the continent of New- 
Holland by Bass Straits. It presents a bold and rugged front to the 
Southern Ocean, lofty basaltic columns resist the dashing of the waves, 
and frequent isthmuses project all around the shores, which are in 
many places penetrated by spacious harbors, affording a secure retreat 
for shipping. The climate is in general temperate ; neither exces 
sive heat nor eold 
prevails; it is never- 
theless variable. Hot 
and pestilential winds 
sometimes blow from 
the north, affecting 
theanirnal sensations, 
blighting vegetation, 
and accelerating de- 
cay. The soil is in 
many parts rich, and 
produces abundance 
of vegetables. Trees 
attain the wonderful 
size of 180 feet in 
height, and 36 in cir- 
cumference, exhibit- 
ing in their decay in- 
disputable evidence 
of the age they have 
Attained. Marine an- 
imals are extremely 
numerous. Vast flocks 
of water fowls cover 
the lagoons, among 
ich is the Black 
Swan, so long con- 
sidered of fabulous 
existence. VAN DEMON'S LAND. 





SPINDLE SHANKS AND DRUM STICKS. 



"ON AN AVERAGE." "How deep is the snow, Mrs. Dumps?" 
u About 4 inches deep, in spots, on an average, ma'am." 

A SENSIBLE QUERY. "What is the use," said a fellow, " of a 
man's working himself to death to get a living." 



A Heavy Dealer 
" Has Mr. Breed got 
any cedar shingles on 
his wharf?" inquired a 
little urchin at the 
counting room door 
" Ves he has." "Well 
I want to get two cents 
worth of prime ones to 
make a sled." 




" You young rascal 
why don't you spell as 
well now as when you 
were in the old house?' 

" I can't exthacly git 
the hang of this new 
school house." 

"Well then, I'll soon 
larn you the bang of 
it." 



NVENIENCE OF A NEW SCHOOL HOUSE. 



CHARLES ELLMS, Agent, 

PUBLISHER, BOOKSELLER AND STATIONER, 

JVb. 8 Hanover street, Boston. 



-HAS CONSTANTLY FOR SALE 



An extensive assortment of School and Juvenile Books, at publishers' 
prices ; London and American Stationery, of the best quality, consisting 
of Drawing, Colored, Tissue, Ivory and Gold Papers;, fine Writing, Let- 
ter, and Billet Paper ; Quills, Ink and Wafers ; Visiting, Blank and Play- 
ing Cards. Also, Cutlery, Pocket Books, Wallets, Fancy Goods and En- 
gravings, at the lowest prices. 

Book Binding, in all its branches, executed with neatness and despatch 



Humorous Works published by CHARLES ELLMS, Agent, Boston. 

The SHAKERS' ALMANAC and BACHELORS' REGISTER, fo 
1835; with fine engravings. Price 12£ cents. O* This is one of the 
most singular productions of the age. 



The QUEER ALMANAC, for 1835; consisting of Jokes, Hoaxes and 
divilish good Things; with engravings. Price 12J cents. 



The COMIC TOKEN, for 1835 ; a companion to the Comic Almanac ; 
illustrated with numerous plates and diverting devices. Price 124 cents. 



Ladies and Gentlemen : 

We present our best compliments and sincere thanks to our 
numerous supporters j and, having found that our four numbers 

already offered "in the 
way of jest" have 
kindly been taken "in 
right good earnest, we 
will conclude by wish 
ing you and all who 
contribute to the hap 
piness of their fellow- 
i — either by good 
humor, or goodness of 
any kind — a "long life 
and a merry one." — 
May you have May 
for your weather, and 
as many flowers for 
your roadside as Flo- 
ra can afford to those 
ho will stoop for 
em ; and your rain 
the showers of 




"It never rains but it pours " 



)f April. 



Mfr 



Comic Aln&an&c, 









n 


j>^i^^- 




d^jwHK^iBtf^ " ^y] 


i^JpH-iFffV. r 


^*^*^ P^afenT- : ^M 


m)/THr — — A h| 

J, 1 v Uo ■ |/- J \ 


tI ?RSiW' 



I